Dating Myths About Interracial Dating

by LaMonique Hamilton

About LaMonique Hamilton

author image

Based in Baltimore, Maryland, LaMonique Hamilton has written on women's issues since 2002. Her work has appeared on the Women in Entertainment Empowerment Network's (WEEN) website and in "Hope Today Magazine." She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from Morgan State University.

Dating Myths About Interracial Dating

There are several dating myths surrounding people who engage in interracial relationships. Many of them are cruel, untrue and are based on fallacies accelerated by our society's inability to have true discussions about race. Most people involved in interracial relationships seek stability, companionship, love, and connection, and have found those very qualities in their partners. They are simply embracing a love that does not know color.

Dissatisfied With Their Own Race

One of the prevailing myths of people who choose to date outside their race is that they hate potential mates of their own race. Though some people prefer to date people of a different race exclusively, most are simply trying to find the most suitable mate for them, regardless of color. When these people marry someone of a different race, it is simply because they felt a connection with their mate more than anyone else.

Not in Committed Relationships

Most interracial couples have genuine friendships, a strong commitment and an abiding love for one another. This shreds the myth that interracial relationships are based on sex, an attraction to the different or even "taboo;" or a longing to be in a casual, non-serious union. Mark Mathabane, director of multicultural education at the Catlin Gabel School in Portland, Oregon suggests that interracial couples "are determined to prove critics wrong by making their union last."

Dating to Change Social Status

A prevalent myth or idea about interracial couples is that one member of the union is desirous of changing his or her social status. Not only is this idea not true in most cases, but is consistent with the objectionable dating practice of 'gold-digging' applied by many people who date others of the same race. The idea of acquiring a 'trophy' of economic or social advancement is deplorable to most people, who are seeking connection and companionship with their mate.

Trying to Act Like Something They're Not

The widespread myth that people who engage in interracial relationships are less black, white, Asian or Hispanic than they would be if they were dating someone of their own race is perhaps one of the most disturbing of all. Being mindful and educated about other cultures and dating someone with a different background than yours does not mean that you have abandoned the beauty and diversity found in your own culture. In fact, the very idea of 'acting black' or 'acting white' should be altogether discarded, as they are more social constructs of stereotypes than actual portrayals of all people within a certain race.

View Singles Near You

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images