What Are the Disadvantages of Being Single?

by Jaime Vargas-Benitez

About Jaime Vargas-Benitez

author image

Jaime Vargas-Benitez has been a parenting writer since 2010. She has worked in the child wellness field in various roles for over 20 years. Along with the experiences of raising her own kids, she has been privileged enough to participate in the raising of hundreds of other children as well.

What Are the Disadvantages of Being Single?

The single life is often portrayed as being fun and carefree, but there are monetary, social and workplace disadvantages as well. The single life offers a degree of independence and freedom from the need to compromise with another person. However, being single means having to carry the burden of a household alone, without a partner to help.

Monetary Disadvantages

The single life has several monetary disadvantages, says psychologist Bella DePaulo in the Psychology Today article "The Pain of Singlism: Is It Personal?" A single person is the sole source of income in the household, meaning all the bills fall on one person with no help from a partner. Married couples can take advantage of lower health insurance costs by utilizing family plans. Also, if both partners work, there is usually an option to be covered by two health insurance plans, a primary and secondary. Spouses also have the option to leave social security benefits to one another.

The Workplace

Single people in the workplace get saddled with more work and longer hours, according to Emily Waters, who holds a master's in psychology, in the Psych Central article "Singled Out for Being Single." A single person is viewed as having more time to devote to work projects than his married counterpart. Married workers may cite family obligations, such as picking up children from daycare, as a reason to leave work earlier. The bulk of the work left is assigned to the single co-worker still in the office.

View Singles Near You

Photo Credits

  • sjenner13/iStock/Getty Images