Senior Project Ideas on Dating

Senior Project Ideas on Dating

by Michelle Barry

About Michelle Barry

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Michelle Barry graduated from Salve Regina University with a Bachelor of Arts in English. Since then, she has worked as a reporter for the Wilbraham-Hampden Times, an editor for Month9Books and Evolved Publishing, editor and has spent the past seven years in marketing and graphic design. She also has an extensive background in dance.

Whether you are a high school senior or a college senior, dating and romance are often at the forefront of your social life. Dating is a topic that interests youth and adults alike and can be impacted by a variety of factors, from technology to social circles to peer pressure. A project on dating can touch upon a variety of subjects and fields, the results of which could be both interesting and enlightening.

Body Language

Our bodies often can say much more than our mouths do, especially in high pressure and socially intense situations such as dating. Conduct and analyze an experiment on how our body language corresponds to the feelings and behaviors of other students on first dates. Observe students on first dates and evaluate their body language, movements and facial expressions. Ask the couple to take a survey following the date to convey their feelings and emotions during the date itself as well as the level of attraction after the date. Collaborate your observations with your survey results to come to a conclusion for the experiment.

Technology

Technology is having an increasingly large impact on dating and social interaction in general. Survey a sample group of students to see how technology, such as video chatting, texting and social networking, has an impact on their dating life. Create a focus groups of established couples to monitor as an experiment. Conduct interviews and observations with the couples as they interact with their normal exposure to technology for a week. Cut them off from modern technology for the following week, such as cell phones, social networking sites and e-mail, and observe how the interaction and relationship differs from the first week of the experiment. Present conclusions on your findings.

Looks vs. Personality

Arrange a variety of blind dates between participating students. Set up a speed dating event in a controlled environment, such as a school cafeteria or lounge. Blindfold both students throughout the entire date. Observe the conversations and conduct surveys following each mini-date to evaluate the level of attraction between the two people. Remove the blindfolds and repeat the experiment. Compare the level of attraction between each pair with and without the blindfold. Conclude if the blindfold helped or hindered the date or if there was no change at all.

Social Pressure

Create and distribute surveys discussing the effects of social pressure on students dating life. Ask students if they feel pressure from their social circles to date and enter into romantic relationships, if they feel a social pressure to engage in sexual relationships and how their social environment impacts the way they feel about dating or approach dating. Ask participating students to indicate their gender and age on the surveys. Compare the answers by age group and gender. Write a paper elaborating on your findings.

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